Is the Keto Diet Right for PCOS?

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Diet is the most crucial component of putting PCOS into remission.

That’s right- having PCOS does not mean you’re doomed!

PCOS is a metabolic syndrome, so women with PCOS must balance their blood sugar in order to put their symptoms into remission, this is why many women find success (at a cost) with diabetic medications such as Metformin. However, Metformin depletes B vitamins and has unpleasant gastrointestinal effects so it’s not the ideal option. It’s best to adapt our diets first, and most times (in addition to certain supplements) this is all it takes.

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PCOS and the Keto Diet

For women with PCOS, I’m a huge fan of the Keto diet, but only as a therapeutic diet observed for about 4-12 weeks.  This is because the Keto diet can be harmful if practiced too long.

There was a small study in 2005 that tested the ability of the keto diet to help manage PCOS and even put it in remission, and it showed promising results. However, the trial groups only practiced the keto diet for 12 weeks.

You see, although the keto diet is excellent for reversing PCOS, diabetes, and balancing blood sugar, if practiced over a long period of time, women can stop menstruating.

This is because women need a certain amount of carbohydrates (somewhere around 150 grams daily) to ovulate and have a period. The keto diet calls for less than 50 grams a day, so women who practice this diet very often stop having periods a few months later.

My solution?

Keto for 4-12 weeks (in tandem with working with a health practitioner) and then practice intermittent fasting while observing a “ketoish” diet that includes healthy carbs like a serving of white rice or sweet potatoes once a day, ideally taken in the evening. As women we need to aim at about 150 grams daily. This number could be 100 grams for some, or higher or lower for others.

Intermittent Fasting

A great form of Intermittent Fasting for women with PCOS is what’s called “Time Restricted Eating”. This means one goes 12-16 hours without eating, and eats all of their food for the day within a certain window. Starting at 12 hours is best (for example stopping eating at 8PM and then having breakfast at 8AM) and then working up to 14 or 16.

It’s best to limit your extended fasts of 14-16 hours to 3-4 times a week, but 12 hours should be your daily baseline.

It’s very important to note that you must listen to your body and let it tell you how long of a fast is right for you. Personally, I find that 14-16 hours is my magic spot! But it took some trial and error.

Intermittent fasting is an excellent tool to balance blood sugar levels, increase mental clarity, boost energy levels, repair our DNA, and reset our digestive system. Basically, the more time you let pass between your dinner and your first meal of the next day, the more of an advantage you are giving your body to regenerate and replenish.

This is all due to ketones.

When you go 12 hours or more without eating, our body switches from using glycogen for fuel to fat. When the fat is burned for fuel it produces ketones. Ketones are a more efficient source of fuel for the body, as they promote weight loss as well as lower cholesterol, blood pressure, and insulin resistance.

An example schedule of how you can practice IF:

-8PM Dinner

-Wake Up: Bulletproof Matcha or Coffee

-8AM Breakfast (12 hours fasting)

or

-10AM Breakfast (14 hours fasting)

Remember, PCOS is not a curse. No it can’t be cured, but with the right diet and lifestyle hacks, along with the correct supplements, you can be symptom free and be a #PCOSTHRIVER just like me!

With Gratitude,

Health Coach Jenna

5 Tips For Balancing Your Blood Sugar (and Why This is Crucial for Women with PCOS)

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Let’s talk PCOS and blood sugar.

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is a condition of insulin resistance and ovulatory dysfunction. This is why keeping  blood sugar balanced is CRUCIAL for managing PCOS and putting it into remission.

For women with PCOS (and everyone else as well!) it’s imperative to design meals with the number one goal of making sure they will balance your blood sugar and give you the nutrients you need.

Your meal should keep you full for at least 3-6 hours, and if you’re hungry 1-2 hours after eating, then this is an indicator that your meal did not promote balanced blood sugar levels.

The link between high blood sugar and PCOS is due to the hormone called insulin.

When the insulin level is elevated due to high blood sugar levels, it will block the receptors on the ovaries that are designed to receive ovarian hormones, and this can stop ovulation. Also, when excess insulin attaches to the receptors, it stimulates the ovaries to produce excess androgens (male hormones). So the overall effect of eating lots of sugar and processed carbs is progression towards infertility and hormonal imbalance (such as manifests with PCOS).

This is why the journey to hormonal balance (not just for women with PCOS but for ALL women) starts with balancing blood sugar levels.

5 Tips for Balancing Blood Sugar: 

  1. Eat healthy fats with every meal (you can read more about these in chapter 3 of “7 Steps to a Healthier You
  2. Stay away from sugar, processed carbs, and high glycemic index fruits (you can find the list in chapter 7 of “7 Steps to a Healthier You”.
  3. Fill half your plate with non-starchy vegetables
  4. Include a lean protein from a clean source.
  5. Avoid snacking. The advice to eat five small meals throughout the day is simply bad advice (the only scenario where this is acceptable is for someone with severe blood sugar instability, but it’s not a permanent solution). Research is now showing that snacking is not the best advice because every time you eat, insulin is released, and insulin is a fat storage hormone! So when you are snacking every two hours you will not lose weight because you are inhibiting the growth hormone that promotes lean muscle mass. This is why you shouldn’t eat right after you exercise! Wait at least an hour.

Signs of blood sugar instability:

  1. Hungry all the time-If you are hungry 1-2 hours after eating your blood sugar has crashed
  2. Food coma- If you get very tired after eating your blood sugar has crashed.
  3. Hangry- if you get “hangry” this means your blood sugar has crashed. You should never get hangry. This is a sign the food you ate spiked you blood sugar and then it crashed.

If you need more support then I encourage you to sign up for a consultation with me!

xxxx

Health Coach Jenna