Turmeric Latte

fullsizerender-17

From curing the common cold to preventing or fighting against cancer, turmeric is an essential spice that you should become familiar with. With a long history of being used in traditional medicines such as ancient India’s Ayurveda, it has lately become more recognized in western practices – it’s really no surprise that it is currently the most studied spice on the planet.

Beat aches, pains and inflammation with Mother Nature’s greatest anti- inflammatory weapon. If you are suffering from pain, and/or participate in athletic activities, turmeric is your best friend. Don’t make the mistake of taking Advil after your athletic training, exercise, yoga, etc. It will kill your mitochondria and your gut flora.

I try to drink a warm cup of turmeric milk everyday. I especially make sure I get my cup in after my yoga practice, as it’s nature’s best anti-inflammatory, helping relieve any general aches and pains. Plus, it’s really delicious – making it a nice treat before bed.

Turmeric Latte Recipe:

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups of coconut milk (or your dairy-free milk of choice)
  • 1 teaspoon dried turmeric powder OR one half-inch fresh turmeric thinly sliced
  • 1 teaspoon dried ginger powder OR one half-inch piece of peeled, fresh ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon.
  • A dash of freshly ground black pepper
  • Honey to taste (use local if possible – this will also help with allergies and do not add to the milk when it is HOT, as this turns the honey toxic. Wait until it is warm.)
  • *Optional- scoop of collagen powder

Directions:

  1. Combine all the ingredients (except the honey) into a blender.
  2. Blend for 30 seconds to a minute.
  3. Pour mixture into saucepan over medium heat.
  4. Bring to boil.
  5. Turn off heat, cover, and allow mixture to cool for a few minutes.
  6. Add honey.
  7. Serve and enjoy!

Alternatively, if you do not have a blender, skip steps one and two and combine all ingredients in a saucepan. If you are using fresh ginger and turmeric, use a strainer to filter them out before serving.

Enjoy!

Health Coach Jenna

HealtherNotions_Logo_Stacked

Matcha Bomb!

fullsizerender-10

My Matcha game is strong, y’all. I used to really enjoy bulletproof coffee in the morning before practice. But now that I don’t drink coffee anymore, I kind of felt left out from the party. Not anymore! This Matcha Bomb is creamy and dreamy.

So what’s matcha you ask?!

Matcha green tea is made from young green tea leaves, and is ground into a fine powder giving it a bright and vibrant green color.

Matcha is:

  • High in antioxidants
  • Promotes concentration due to the L-Theanine. Traditionally, monks drank matcha as a means to relax and meditate while staying alert.
  • Increases energy levels and endurance without the side-effects of coffee like nervousness.
  • Supports the immune system with its high content of Vitamin A and C.

Personally, I jive better with matcha as it gives me a steady release of caffeine throughout my morning, unlike the intense surge of nervous energy that coffee gives me.

Matcha Bomb Recipe:

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup dairy free milk (I use coconut milk, but other nut milks work nicely, too)
  • 1/2 teaspoon of matcha powder
  • 1 tablespoon of coconut oil or Bulletproof High Octane Oil
  • 1 tablespoon ghee from grass-fed cows, or unsalted butter from grass-fed cows (KerryGold is a good option)

 Optional

Directions:

  1. Put all of your ingredients in a blender and blend until frothy and smooth.
  2. Pour contents into saucepan and heat over low heat until it comes to a low boil.
  3. Pour into your favorite mug and enjoy!

xxxxxx

Health Coach Jenna

Mint Chocolate Chip Smoothie

Processed with VSCO with c1 preset

My favorite ice cream flavor growing up was Mint Chocolate Chip. These days, I’m not a dairy eater, but you can bet your bottom dollar that I still enjoy mint chocolate chip treats!

This morning I had dessert for brekkie (as usual) with this vegan Mint Chocolate Chip smoothie. Who knew having dessert for breakfast could give you 24 servings of organic veggies and fruits, plus probiotics? Thanks to Paradise’s Orac Energy Green powder, with one scoop I’m covered.

So don’t believe those lies that you have to eat your veggies before you can have your pudding. You can have it all at the same time, and not even taste the green. This Mint Chocolate Chip smoothie is so good, even my husband asked for one. When I told him I put what he calls “green powder” in it, he didn’t believe me.

Find out how to make this smoothie below, and to order your Energy Green powder, use the code QCW626 to get $5 off.

Mint Chocolate Chip Smoothie Recipe:

  • 1 cup dairy free milk (I use Koh coconut)
  • 1/2 cup full fat coconut milk
  • 1tbs chia seeds
  • 1 scoop Orac Energy Greens
  • 1 scoop Vanilla protein powder ( I use Vega)
  • pinch of cinnamon
  • handful of ice cubes
  • 1/4 tsp of peppermint oil
  • 1 tbs. raw cacao
  • Blend and top with dark chocolate if desired.

Enjoy!

Health Coach Jenna

 

Cleansing Cucumber Juice

Processed with VSCO with m3 preset

Cucumber juice is one of the most effective ways to hydrate, cleanse and alkalize the body. It’s the perfect tonic for losing weight and alleviating digestive problems like bloating, heartburn and indigestion. Sometimes I juice straight cucumber and add it to my water throughout the day with a squeeze of lemon.

Today I made a sweet potion with cucumber, lemon, ginger and apple. I recommend this juice any time you are feeling bloated, or feel the need for cleansing after a day of indulgence. It’s a great juice to have daily, as it will keep you hydrated and feeling groovy, and is the perfect juice to add to any detox.

Ingredients:

  •  2 large peeled cucumbers
  • 1/2 green apple 🍏
  • 1 lemon 🍋
  • 1 inch piece of peeled ginger

Happy Juicing!

Health Coach Jenna

 

HealtherNotions_Logo_Stacked

Energy Zinger Juice

Processed with VSCO with c1 presetI’m not a coffee drinker anymore!! I know I feel just as weird typing it as it sounds..

I started drinking coffee at the age of 5 when I would sneak the last sips of my mom’s cup. It was love at first sip, and I was drinking a cup every morning by the time I was 9! This carried on and coffee has always been a huge part of my life. It took an even bigger role when I became an Ashtanga yoga practitioner, because it helped provide energy for waking up at 4 AM.

But just this year, at 30, I had a huge WAKE UP call. My hormones were not balanced. My cortisol levels were high and my progesterone low. No Bueno. So I had to have an intervention with myself and stop the coffee.

I transitioned to green tea for 3 days, then cut all caffeine out for 10 days, and coffee for a complete month. I’m not gonna lie, the headaches were AWFUL. But after 3 days I was fine. And you know what? I have more energy now then ever! An energy that just feels natural, not artificial. I now drink hot cacao or matcha before my yoga practice, and my magic drink in post practice.

The juice pictured here was a saving grace when I was having withdraws from coffee, and I still drink it almost daily in lieu of a cup of Jo. I call it the Energy Zinger.

Energy Zinger Ingredients:

  • 4 -6 carrots depending on size
  • 5 stalks celery
  • 1/2 green apple
  • 1 inch piece of peeled ginger root
  • 1 inche piece of peeled turmeric root
  • 1 lemon or lime

Juice and enjoy the natural buzz! I like to enjoy mine in the afternoon, as it gives me a nice little pick me up.

Have you recently quit coffee? What are some methods that helped you with the transition? I would love to hear any tips, so put em’ in the comment section below!

xx

Health Coach Jenna

How To Make Kefir

Hey Folks!

Fermented foods are my jam. I love them more than most anything, as I know how healthy and vibrant they make my body. The key to good health is maintaining healthy bacteria in our gut- it’s pretty much crucial to our physical wellbeing, and as we have learned, our mental wellbeing as well.

It’s important to get at least 2-3 fermented foods a day, and  kefir is an excellent fermented food that can be incorporated at breakfast, or any other meal of the day. I really enjoy kefir with oatmeal, or in a smoothie, as it has a nice tangy taste that gives smoothies a refreshing and creamy kick.

Today, Abby Quillen is sharing with us a recipe for kefir (both water and milk versions) , as well as its excellent nutritional benefits.

Ways Microbiota is Good For You

Guest post by Abby Quillen:

A healthy human gut harbors 100 trillion microorganisms representing 500 different species.1 These microflora outnumber our human cells 10 to 1.2 The good news is that most of them are our allies. They aid digestion, boost immune function, and help us absorb nutrients. It’s no wonder more and more people are taking probiotics.Luckily, you don’t need to spend a bundle on supplements to boost your gut biome. Eating probiotic-rich fermented foods – as people have done for thousands of years – has the same gut health benefits. If fermentation sounds like a scary science experiment, then it’s time to learn how to make kefir, one of the healthiest and easiest-to-make probiotic-rich foods.

Kefir 101

Kefir is tangy, mildly carbonated, fermented milk. It tastes like drinkable yogurt and has been a regular part of Russian and Eastern European diets for centuries. It’s a true superfood packed with calcium, protein, potassium, and other minerals and vitamins, and it abounds with healthy bacteria, yeasts, and enzymes.

ConsumerLab.com tests showed that a serving of store-bought kefir beats supplements when it comes to the number and diversity of probiotics. Every brand of kefir they tested teemed with “live organisms, ranging from 150 billion to 950 billion per cup – far more than found in a serving of most probiotic supplements.”3

Homemade kefir contains even more microorganisms than store-bought varieties, because most home fermenters use kefir grains that contain between 30 and 50 different strains of healthy bacteria and yeast. In one study, just one tablespoon of milk kefir contained 150 billion colony-forming units (cfu), a measure of viable bacterial or fungal cells. Compare that to most supplements, which usually contain between 3.4 billion and 30 billion cfu.

The probiotics present in kefir vary per batch, but here’s a list of bacteria strains commonly found in homemade kefir:

  • Lactobacillus
  • Lactococcus
  • Leuconostoc
  • Pseudomonas
  • Streptococcus

These yeast strains are common to kefir:

  • Candida
  • Torulaspora
  • Kluyveromyces
  • Saccharomyces45

The best part is that kefir is simple, fast, inexpensive, and safe to make at home. If you’ve struggled to ferment vegetables or yogurt in the past, don’t let those experiences scare you away from DIY kefir. The entire fermentation process only takes 24 hours at room temperature.

Not into dairy? No problem. Milk kefir can be made with coconut milk. Or you can make water kefir, a delicious and popular soda substitute. Read on to learn the basics of both.

The Difference Between the Grains

First off, milk kefir grains aren’t really grains. They’re a mixture of lactic acid, bacteria, and yeasts in a matrix of proteins, lipids, and sugars, and they contain the wonder bugs that turn milk into kefir.

Kefir grains are not available at stores, but they can be purchased online from a number of vendors. Or they can be found locally on message boards or via friends. If the grains are well cared for, they can be reused indefinitely to brew batch after batch of kefir. And they grow, which means you’ll eventually have some to share.

Kefir can also be made from a powdered starter culture, which is how it’s brewed commercially. However, the grains contain more strains of probiotics and are a more economical choice, since you can use the same ones to make kefir indefinitely.

Water kefir grains contain fewer strains of bacteria and yeast than milk kefir grains, and resemble sugar rather than milk curds. Similar to milk kefir grains, they can be purchased from a number of online vendors, and they can be used over and over again.

How to Make Milk Kefir

Ingredients:

  • 4 tablespoons kefir grains
  • 1 quart milk

Choose one of these options:

  • Cow, sheep, or goat milk

Pasteurized milk works great, but avoid ultra-pasteurized and reduced-lactose varieties. The milk can contain any percentage of fat.

  • Coconut milk

Milk kefir grains can also ferment coconut milk. It may take the grains a few brews to adjust to non-dairy milk. Revitalize them every few days by covering with dairy milk and leaving overnight.

Equipment:

Kefir is acidic, so avoid letting it come into contact with metal, which can cause a reaction.

  • 3 quart-sized jars with lid rings
  • Coffee filter, cloth, or other breathable material (enough to cover two jars)
  • Non-metallic colander or strainer
  • Rubber spatula or wooden spoon
  • Non-metallic mixing bowl

Instructions:

  1. Sterilize the jars.
  2. Depending on where you get your grains, they may be dehydrated. If so, follow the directions provided by the vendor for rehydration. If grains are resting in water, strain.
  3. Place 4 tablespoons of grains into a jar.
  4. Fill the jar with milk.
  5. Affix breathable material with a jar ring.
  6. Set the jar on the countertop out of direct sunlight or in a cupboard for 24 hours. Shake occasionally.
  7. Strain the kefir through the colander into the mixing bowl.
  8. Transfer the kefir into a clean jar. Smell and taste. If the kefir is thick, tangy, and slightly fizzy, it’s perfect. Affix a non-metallic lid, refrigerate, and enjoy. If sour is not your thing, read on for tips to sweeten the kefir.
  9. Move the grains from the colander into the last jar. Repeat the process to make another batch of kefir, or cover the grains with milk and place in the refrigerator. Cold slows the fermentation, so the grains will rest there until you’re ready to make kefir again. Some experts say not to rest grains in the refrigerator regularly. However, many fermenters do because it’s difficult to keep up with drinking quarts of kefir daily. Fortunately, kefir grains tend to be quite resilient.
  10. Kefir should not taste or smell rotten. If it does, or if anything else about it seems off, discard the liquid, rinse the grains in non-chlorinated water, and start over.
How to Enjoy Milk Kefir

How to Make Water Kefir

Ingredients:

  • 1 tablespoon water kefir grains
  • 1/4 cup sugar, sucanat, rapadura, agave nectar, or maple syrup
  • 1 quart of water
  • Optional flavorings
    • Ginger
    • Lemon slices
    • Berries, sliced in half
    • Dried fruit
    • 2 teaspoons vanilla
    • 1 teaspoon cinnamon or another dried spice
    • 2 1/4 cup raisins

Equipment:

  • 3 quart-sized jars with metal lid rings
  • Coffee filter, cloth, or other breathable material, enough to cover two jars
  • Non-metallic colander or strainer
  • Rubber spatula or wooden spoon
  • Non-metallic mixing bowl
  • Flip-top bottles (optional)

Instructions:

  1. Sterilize jars.
  2. Depending on where you get your grains, they may be dehydrated. If so, follow the directions provided by the vendor for rehydration. If grains are resting in water, strain.
  3. Boil water.
  4. Add the heated water and sweetener to a quart-sized jar. Stir until sweetener dissolves in water. Let the mixture cool to room temperature.
  5. Add the water kefir grains.
  6. Cover with breathable material and leave on countertop for 24 to 48 hours, shaking occasionally.
  7. Prepare a new batch of sugar water.
  8. Strain the grains by pouring through a colander into a mixing bowl. Transfer the finished water kefir into a clean jar.
  9. If desired, add optional flavorings, pour into the flip-top bottles, seal, and return to the countertop for 18 to 24 hours. This second fermentation adds flavor and fizziness.
  10. After 24 hours, strain out the flavorings, return the water kefir to the bottles, store in the refrigerator, and enjoy whenever desired.
  11. Place the grains in the new batch of sugar water. Either repeat the process or place the jar in the refrigerator to rest for up to 3 weeks.
  12. Water kefir grains can grow rapidly. Share any extra with friends, eat, or compost.67

Cautions

Milk and water kefir are delicious, and it’s quick and easy to whip up abundant supplies. But be cautious about drinking too much too soon. Remember, these beverages contain a lot of probiotics. Your body probably isn’t used to digesting foods that contain that many good bugs. Start with small quantities (maybe just a couple of tablespoons) and increase gradually to let your body adjust. If you experience any digestive upset, slow down.

Kefir is a powerhouse beverage for most healthy people, but it may not be the right drink for people who have compromised immune systems or artificial heart valves, or who are taking certain medications. If in doubt, ask your doctor first.

People who abstain from alcohol may want to skip kefir. Milk kefir contains a very small amount of naturally occurring alcohol from the fermentation process. Water kefir that is fermented a second time with fruit contains more alcohol but usually has less than 1 percent alcohol by volume (compared to 3.5 to 10 percent for beer).8 The actual amount varies per batch by the sugar content of the fruit and the length of fermentation time.

Conclusion

The word “kefir” is said to come from the Turkish word kief, which loosely means “good feeling.”9 Once you start making it, it’s easy to understand how this substance got its name. Making kefir is an ancient art that easily fits into busy, modern lives. If you want the benefits of probiotics without the supplements, it’s time to discover this wonder drink.

 

Sources:

  1. http://www.health.harvard.edu/vitamins-and-supplements/health-benefits-of-taking-probiotics
  2. https://nccih.nih.gov/health/probiotics/introduction.htm
  3. https://www.consumerlab.com/news/Probiotic_supplements_kefir_drinks/11_06_2015/
  4. http://www.culturesforhealth.com/milk-kefir-grains-composition-bacteria-yeast
  5. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3716650/
  6. https://www.wholetraditions.com/articles/3-water-kefir-instructions
  7. http://www.culturesforhealth.com/how-to-make-water-kefir
  8. http://kellythekitchenkop.com/does-kefir-soda-have-alcohol/
  9. http://journals.usamvcluj.ro/index.php/agriculture/article/download/930/926

 

About Abby:

abby

Abby Quillen is a writer and gardener who has written for a number of publications and penned her own book titled “The Garden of Dead Dreams.” She lives in Oregon with her family where she enjoys gardening, walking and bike riding, and jotting down the cute things her children say.

This article was originally published on Fix.com on January 18,2016.

Tips for Staying Hydrated This Summer

drinkwater

Summer time is here, folks! Time for the beach, pool parties, and family vacations. But with the sublime summer vibes come the rising temperatures. So it is crucial you continue to stay hydrated. Many health problems stem from simply not drinking enough water, which is a shame because it’s such an easy fix!

Your body is made up of 70 percent water and your brain is almost 80 percent water, so it is imperative to stay fully hydrated for optimum health. Being completely hydrated boosts your metabolism, gives you more energy, burns more calories, and you will find it easier to sustain a healthy weight.

Sounds amazing right?!

What Type of Water Should I Drink?

Seeing as the average public water supply contains a minimum of 27 different chemicals from toxins such as pharmaceutical drugs, pesticides, herbicides, and insect repellants, ideally you should aim to drink purified, spring or filtered water.

How Much Should I Drink?

Drink half your bodyweight (in pounds) in ounces per day.

For example, if you weight 150 pounds (68kg) you should drink 75 ounces (2.2 liters) of water per day.

When Should I Drink It?

I recommend drinking one liter first thing in the morning. Doing this will flush out all of those yucky toxins that your organs were working hard to get rid of while you were sleeping and dreaming of unicorns.

Good ole’ organs, huh?

Drink the rest of the water throughout the day, and try to avoid drinking loads before bed, as this could interrupt your beauty sleep with frequent visits to the loo.

It’s also best to not drink COLD water right before or during your meals, as this diverts energy to heat up the cold water to body temperature -the same energy that should be digesting your food. The best rule of thumb is to hydrate in between meals, and to drink a cup of room temperature water 10-20 minutes before meals. Cold water, however, is okay at other times.

Do whatever it takes to remember to drink your quota. Some suggested methods include:

  • Pour your daily water quota into pitchers and make sure you finish them.
  • Set an alarm on your phone throughout the day, reminding you to drink a glass.
  • Put your car keys in the bottom of a liter of water so you have to drink it before you can get to work. No, just kidding. But if you think it would work for you then by all means give it a whirl!

And remember to fill up your BPA free water bottles so you don’t have to buy plastic water bottles when away from the house. I personally love my Klean Kanteen, and never leave the house without it.

Make sure to not don’t be a sucker to those sugary sports drinks that advertise themselves as “healthy”- they lie!  The only gifts these will leave you with are diabetes and/or weight gain. The best supplement to drink (in addition to your daily water quota) is pure coconut water. Coconut water is better than any sports drink, as it is naturally full of electrolytes. But make sure you buy the kind that is not from concentrate, and avoid ones with added sugars like the plague.

Alright folks, enjoy your summer and remember to stay hydrated!

xxxx

Health Coach Jenna

HealtherNotions_Logo_Stacked

 

Matcha Gotcha

Hey folks! My friend and fellow health coach, Andi Smith, has created this delicious smoothie recipe, and oh does it looks divine!

Enjoy 🙂

IMG_9717

Guest Post by Andi Smith Wellness:

Matcha is a powdered green tea with a smooth, frothy texture. It’s perfect as a warm drink on its own or a delicious ingredient in smoothies. What makes matcha stand out amongst other green teas is that the whole leaf is consumed, maximizing the amount of vital nutrients, vitamins, and antioxidants. A few of the amazing health benefits include lowering blood pressure, balancing blood sugar, boosting your immune system.

My Matcha Gotcha is the perfect thing for increasing your immunity in order to protect against colds this season.

 Recipe: (serves 1)

  • 3 cups almond milk
  • 1 banana
  • 3-5 leaves of romaine
  • 1 tablespoon flaxseed oil
  • 1 teaspoon spirulina
  • 1 scoop protein powder of choice (pea protein and/or fermented protein)
  • 1-2 teaspoon matcha
  • 1-2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • handful of ice
  • top with goji berries

Directions:

Blend everything together, except goji berries, until smooth. Top with goji berries and enjoy!

About Andi Smith

IMG_2741

Andi Smith is a certified recreational therapist, wellness coach, certified culinary nutrition expert, and food photographer. She loves spending time in the kitchen creating new recipes, helping people meet their health goals, and spending time outdoors with her dog, Lucy. She educates people on how to implement realistic habits into their daily lives to increase their energy and overall health. Follow her on Twitter or check out her website at AndiSmithWellness.com.

 

MILK. Does It Really Do the Body Good?

milkLet’s talk milk. Dairy is controversial and is the cause of many debates between health professionals. Some say dairy is healthy while others believe it should be avoided like the bubonic plague. The truth is, around 60% of the entire world is somewhat lactose intolerant, which means they can’t digest the milk protein, lactose.

If you are lactose intolerant and drinking cow’s milk, you could be experiencing symptoms such as bloating, gas, constipation, loose stools, and allergies that may lead to ear, nose and throat infections.

If your body can digest cow’s milk and you feel like it is the right fit for your body, by all means it’s your choice to stick with it. However, I encourage you to eliminate it from your diet for at least 10 days to see how your body feels without it. You might be surprised by the results.

I personally avoid dairy milk, as I feel lighter and more vibrant without it. I agree with Dr. Hyman when he says “cow’s milk is the perfect beverage…. for a baby cow”.

So what are my alternatives?

Switch to a dairy-free milk such as almond milk, coconut milk, hemp seed milk, or rice milk. I encourage you to pick one with no added sugars and to choose the organic version.

It’s also best to stay away from soy milk as it has high levels of phytoestrogens, which mimic the body’s natural estrogen hormones. For women, this can lead to estrogen dominance, which has been linked to infertility, menstrual problems, and cancer. For men, it can cause testosterone imbalances, low sperm count, and cancer.

Bottom line – soy is not healthy and its widespread use is destructive to the environment. *

But what about calcium?

Adults need 1,000 mg of calcium per and the fact that we need milk to get this daily dose is a myth created by clever ads to keep us buying milk products. In fact, according to the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, “Animal protein leaches calcium from the bones, leading to its excretion in the urine.” This means that when you consume cow’s milk it changes the pH level in the body and turns the blood acidic, notifying the body to neutralize the damaging acidic protein before it reaches the kidneys. The only way to neutralize it is by using our stored calcium, which is drawn from our bones, causing a reverse and undesirable effect.

In reality, the best and most efficient way to get calcium is from dark leafy greens, and foods such as almonds, salmon, black-eyed peas, white beans, seaweed, seseme seeds, and oranges. In addition, most dairy-free milks found in the store are fortified with calcium. However, if you are making your own dairy-free milk this will not be the case.

calcium

But what if I want to stick with cow’s milk?

If you would like to keep cow’s milk in your diet, then it’s crucial that you switch to organic. You should choose organic milk because it is free of synthetic hormones, antibiotics, chemical fertilizers, pesticides, and GMOs. Studies have also shown that organic milk has higher levels of vitamin E, omega-3, antioxidants, and beta-carotene.

Non-organic milk contains harmful contaminants from antibiotics, growth hormones, and pesticides.  One of the most dangerous is the bovine growth hormone (rBGH). The bovine growth hormone is given to cows to make them produce milk faster to keep up with the increasing demands worldwide.

According to a study titled Monsanto’s Hormonal Milk Poses Serious Risks of Breast Cancer, Besides Other Cancers, “Drinking rBGH milk would thus be expected to significantly increase IGF-1 blood levels. And higher levels of IGF-1 are linked to several cancers.”

Cows that are injected with rBGH are more likely to form an infection called Mastitis, causing the cow to produce pus which ends up in your milk.

GROSS.

Even more disgusting is that in order to beat the infection, cows are given antibiotics, which also end up in your glass.

DOUBLE GROSS.

In addition, the cow feed used is most times genetically modified corn, creating a decrease in healthy Omega- 3 fatty acids, and an increase in Omega- 6 fatty acids.

Fat-free, low-fat, or full-fat?

If you are still set on drinking cow’s milk, it’s best to stay away from fat-free milk and choose either a full-fat or low- fat option. Healthy fats are our friends and they help keep us satiated, allow the body to absorb nutrients more efficiently, as well as promote brain health.

In the long run, it’s up to you to decide what is best for your body. I’m a big believer in bio-individuality, which means that each person has unique food and lifestyle needs. One person’s food could be another person’s poison, so it’s up to you to discover what works for you!

Cheers!

Health Coach Jenna

 

*2-3 servings a week of FERMENTED soy (tempeh, tofu, miso) is okay if your body can digest soy. If you are suffering from an autoimmune disease or any sort of endocrine system balance, it is best to avoid all forms of soy.

My Quick and Easy Cold Fighting Remedy Recipe

gingerteaThere is never a good time for a cold – especially while on the road! Right now I can feel one coming on so I’ve made a quick and easy cold fighting remedy: Ginger tea with turmeric and honey.

Why does it work?

The ginger is an immune booster and it also clears the micro-circulatory channels of the body, including those annoying sinuses that flare up during colds. Ginger also warms up the body, so it promotes healthy sweating that detoxifies and releases cold symptoms. Turmeric is rich in curcumin which can prevent infections from getting worse. It’s also a powerful anti-inflammatory that will aid in faster healing. The honey is anti-bacterial and antiviral, and also helps soothe the throat as well as provide a sweetness to the drink.

My Quick and Easy Cold Fighting Remedy:

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 an inch of peeled, fresh ginger cut up into small chunks, or 1 teaspoon of ginger powder
  •  1/2 an inch of peeled, fresh turmeric cut up into small chunks or 1 teaspoon of turmeric powder
  •  Honey to taste (use raw if possible and remember honey is high in fructose so don’t go all crazy with it. I use about 1 tablespoon)

Directions:

  1. Pour boiling water over the turmeric and ginger.
  2. Let infuse until warm. About 5-10 minutes
  3. Stir in honey. 
  4. Add lemon if available.

If you are on the road and can’t find turmeric, no worries – the ginger and honey will still work wonders!

When I’m done with my tea I like to reuse the fresh ginger and turmeric to make another cup. Of course you can’t do this if using powders, but the fresh roots can make at least two powerful cups of cold-fighting goodness.

Now, go show that cold who is boss!

Health Coach Jenna

HealtherNotions_Logo_Stacked