10 Reasons Why You Should Add Ghee to Your Diet

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Much like coconut oil, ghee is a multi-purpose fat that is healthy in many ways. I religiously start my day off with a cup of matcha or coffee (after my warm lemon water of course!), blended with one tablespoon of ghee, and a tablespoon of Brain Octane Oil. This keeps my metabolism revving,  my hormones nourished, helps my body maintain a healthy weight, and gives me a burst of mental clarity.

Find out why you might want to include ghee into your daily diet as well.

10 Reasons to Eat Ghee:

1. High in Omega 3 Fatty Acids

Because ghee—if it is from grass-fed cows—is high in Omega 3s, it protects against inflammation which is great news for those who suffer from painful periods or pelvic pain due to endometriosis or adenomyosis.

2. Promotes Healthy Weight

Ingesting ghee helps pull fat-soluble toxins from your cells and stimulates your fat metabolism resulting in your body burning its own fat for fuel.

3. Supports Gut Health

Ghee creates beneficial bacteria in our gut and it also contains butyric acid, which helps keep the lining of the gut wall strong. This prevents you from getting leaky gut syndrome.

4. Easy to Digest

Because ghee is lactose free it is easy to digest. Ayurveda, India’s traditional system of medicine meaning “science of life”, teaches that ghee stimulates the digestive fire which speeds up the metabolism.

5. Lactose Free

Ghee is safe for those with dairy allergies because the lactose has been removed during the clarification process. Most of the casein (the protein from animal foods shown to cause cancer) has also been removed. However, if you are casein intolerant you should not consume ghee as it still contains trace amounts.

6. Makes for the Perfect Cooking Oil

Ghee has a high smoke point of 485’F / 252’C making it a great oil for cooking.

7. Tastes Amazing

Ghee is rich and delicious. One of my favorite meals is veggies cooked in ghee with some hemp seeds sprinkled on top.

8. Fat Soluble Vitamin Heaven

Ghee is chock full of vitamins such as:

  • Vitamin E: Most adults are deficient in this. It’s important to get sufficient intake as it is a potent antioxidant and immune system booster. Vitamin E is also important for eye health and has cancer fighting properties.
  • Vitamin A: Important for healthy vision, immune function, and proper cell growth.
  • Vitamin K: Prevents blood clotting, protects from heart disease, ensures healthy skin, forms strong bones, and promotes brain function. In studies it has been show to reduce the risk of prostate cancer.
  • Vitamin D: Plays a key role in almost all of our physiological functions. It is an immune system regulator so it is vital to our health. Vitamin D aids in prevention of osteoporosis, many types of cancer, depression, diabetes and obesity.

9. Ghee made from grass-fed cows contains CLA.

Studies indicate that conjugated linoleic acid may help to reduce tumors, lower cholesterol and high blood pressure, reduce inflammation, and actually lower body fat.

10. Ghee contains butyrate, an essential short-chain fatty acid

Butyrate, or butyric acid, is a short-chain fatty acid that improves colon health. It’s been shown to support healthy insulin levels, is an anti-inflammatory, and may be helpful for individuals suffering from IBS, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

Have you tried ghee before? What are your favorite ways to add it to your diet? Tell me all about it in the comments section below!

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Health Coach Jenna

Why Eating Fat Makes You Thin & How To Distinguish the Good From the Bad

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I have a love affair with fat. I must be making up for lost time in the 90’s. But sadly, many lovely people are missing out because of a silly fad that began in the 1980’s.

A little nutrition history:

In the 1980’s, fat was deemed the new enemy ,and the food industry was quick to jump to action. As a result, food corporations created a variety of fat-free and low-fat products that started spreading on the shelves of the supermarkets like wild fire. The mantra was “take out the fat and add lots of sugar”.

And you know what? We gobbled it up.

But this insanity stops here – no longer will be buy into this fallacy. Today we are more knowledgeable, and as numerous studies have discovered, fats are crucial for our health and for maintaining our optimum weight.

The caveat, however, is that not all fats are created equally.

Know Your Enemies:

Here is the golden rule: There are good fats and there are bad fats. The good fats are your friends and promote weight loss, brain health and normal levels of cholesterol. They also protect against inflammation, which causes disease and obesity. The bad fats on the other hand promote abnormal levels of cholesterol, weight gain, and inflammation.

Which one would you choose?

The Good Guys:

  • Unprocessed organic oils like coconut oil, avocados and avocado oil,
  • Organic butter from grass-fed cows, clarified butter, and extra virgin olive oil.
  • Raw nuts and seeds like chia seeds, flax seeds, almonds, pumpkin seeds, and walnuts.
  • Egg yolks from pastured hens.
  • Lean meat from animals that are free range and/or grass fed.
  • Coconut oil, which has special medium-chain fatty acids that promote a healthy metabolism, immune system, skin and thyroid.

 The Bad Guys:

  • Corn oil
  • Canola oil
  • Soy oil
  • Hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated fats
  • Margarine and shortening

 So what makes the bad fats bad and the good fats good?

 It all comes down to the Omega 3’s And 6’s.

The good fats are full of healthy Omega 3’s and 6’s and the bad guys are overloaded with Omega 6’s. For optimum health the ideal ratio of Omega 6 to 3 is 1:1. However, thanks to the Standard American Diet (S.A.D), the average American has a 15:1 ratio. This is a direct result from highly processed vegetable oils and trans fat.

But won’t eating fat make me fat?

No! Not if you are eating the good, friendly fats. Eating healthy fats keeps you satiated longer, and gets your metabolism revving, enabling you to burn more fat and maintain a healthy weight.

But what about my cholesterol?

According to a study by one of the world’s leading cholesterol experts, Dr. Ronald Krauss, a low-fat diet changed healthy cholesterol profiles into heart attack-prone profiles with high triglycerides, low HDL, and small LDL particles.

As we have learned, it’s the type of fat you eat, not the quantity. The bad fats promote abnormal cholesterol levels, and the good fats improve the type and quantity of your cholesterol.

Plus, women NEED fats to produce cholesterol because cholesterol makes all of our hormones. If you are eating a low-fat diet, your hormones will suffer.

So pick up where you left off with fats in the 80’s or 90’s. You’ve been separated for way too long now.

Reunited and it feels so good,

Health Coach Jenna

 

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